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Brookhaven mayoral race heads to runoff
by Nicole Dow
November 07, 2012 01:13 AM | 5088 views | 6 6 comments | 22 22 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Staff / Samantha M. Shal
Staff / Samantha M. Shal
slideshow
Staff / Samantha M. Shal.Sandy Murray
Staff / Samantha M. Shal.Sandy Murray
slideshow
Brookhaven residents will be waiting until the Dec. 4 runoff election to find out who will be the first mayor of the newly established city.

Tuesday night’s election results from Brookhaven’s 12 precincts show that candidates J. Max Davis and Sandy Murray were the top runners for mayor but neither earned more than the necessary 50 percent plus one vote.

With slightly more than 2,000 votes than Murray, Davis received 48.6 percent of votes while Murray took in 35.9 percent. Tuesday night’s voter tally did not include the results of the city’s provisional ballots.

Davis, a lifelong resident of Brookhaven, led the race for much of the night. He said if chosen mayor, he looks forward to working to make the city “the jewel of the South in the next five years.”

As president of Brookhaven Yes, Davis helped lead the charge to charter Brookhaven as a city. Among his priorities if chosen as mayor, he said he would focus on building a police department, improving parks, creating more sidewalks and selecting city service providers through a competitive bidding process.

Murray, a Brookhaven resident of about 10 years, said she has similar goals for the new city. If chosen as mayor, Murray said she would work to build a police department, create an open and transparent government and look into making the city more pedestrian friendly and safer for bicyclists.

“We’ll develop a plan, which the governor’s commission has started very nicely, and we’ll just start working towards accomplishing our goals one by one,” she said.

A total of 15,866 Brookhaven residents cast their ballots for mayor.
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Will Swinson
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November 08, 2012
I don't understand your question. If the shoe were on the other foot, there wouldn't be an office to run for. I'm just worried that folks who were against the creation of the city don't have an interest in seeing the city succeed. These comments suggest that may not be the case, and I am relieved by that. I still maintain, however, that it makes more sense to have a mayor who was for the city than one who was against it.
A Brookhaven Voter
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November 10, 2012
As a resident of more than 15 years of the Brookhaven neighborhood, I voted NO. I was against the creation of the city of Brookhaven because i could foresee all the problems linked to the establishment of a new city during an economic downturn.

The YES won, i accepted that result. Being for the NO doesn't mean that we harbor an ill will or we want to see this new city fail. No, not at all. This is a democracy and we need to accept the results. What is important to me is the future of the city and the temperament of the future major. Having talked to both candidates extensively and listened to them, it has become clear to me that one has the temperament and the demeanor, and the other thinks he is running for the governor mansion.
Will Swinson
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November 07, 2012
Someone please explain to me why so many people voted for Sandy Murray. How can someone who was against the creation of the city of Brookhaven have any credibility as its mayor? This isn't a rhetorical question. I really want to know if there is something here I'm not comprehending.
Brookhaven Resident
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November 07, 2012
I've seen this question many times, and it confuses me. Two groups of active community members fought over whether to create a new government entity to take over control of some of their services (City of Brookhaven). One side campaigned that a new city would provide better services at reduced costs, and the other side campaigned that a new city would have the potential to increase costs, decrease quality of service, and introduce corruption.

The supporters of a new city won on that question by a narrow margin. However, that doesn't mean that the half of the area residents who were against the city should stop participating in their community. Creation of an effective city government is now the most important issue facing our area, and every citizen is valuable.

Those who were against the city had their views because of the risks of a poorly executed city government. Now that a city will definitely exist, I would imagine their goal is to set up the city so that those risks are mitigated. I believe that a good argument could be made that those who were most sensitive to the risks would be the best to address them.

Opposition to the previous city-hood vote provides insight into Murray's motivations, but it certainly doesn't cost her credibility.
Brookhaven resident
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November 07, 2012
I too am confused why anyone who was against the creation of the city is discredited with a seat on the commission or running for Mayor. Our community was divided (almost equally) and we must have equal representation on the board. J.Max Davis told me he felt the same way about Jim Eyre running for District 2 and I was shocked that he thought you could only have those who voted "yes" run for office. We can't all be the same, we must have equal representation for our community. What if the shoe were on the other foot? Should J.Max Davis run?

The fact that our community was so divided should tell us something. Creation of the City of Brookhaven was and is happening too fast - makes you wonder, why?
Carl Childers
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November 08, 2012
I have done extensive research on this topic.

Sandy is the best candidate who is all for openness and honesty. J Max is in this for himself. People know that. And he takes money from vendors. And he wants to gamble with our safety with a plan for an inadequate police force.

Understand, I am a scientist and a genius. Notice my enormous cranium.
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