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Dallas Theatre gives young people a chance to learn, act in a play
by Adam Elrod
aelrod@neighbornewspapers.com
July 02, 2013 09:23 AM | 1781 views | 0 0 comments | 61 61 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Participants in Drama Camp, from left, Emery Dupes, 10, daughter of Hollie and Mark Dupes, of Acworth, Lanna Ray, 10, daughter of Suzanna Olds and Sam Ray, of Dallas, and Eli McAdams, 11, son of Michelle and Tony McAdams, of Dallas read over their scripts for a play they are preparing for during camp at the Dallas Theatre.
Participants in Drama Camp, from left, Emery Dupes, 10, daughter of Hollie and Mark Dupes, of Acworth, Lanna Ray, 10, daughter of Suzanna Olds and Sam Ray, of Dallas, and Eli McAdams, 11, son of Michelle and Tony McAdams, of Dallas read over their scripts for a play they are preparing for during camp at the Dallas Theatre.
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Drama Camp Councilor, Terrell Fleming, of Dallas looks on from the bottom of the stage as they children of drama camp go through some of their lines for a play.
Drama Camp Councilor, Terrell Fleming, of Dallas looks on from the bottom of the stage as they children of drama camp go through some of their lines for a play.
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Studying her lines for an upcoming skit, Lauren Cote, 10, daughter of Margaret and Kenneth Cote, of Lithia Springs learns about acting at the Dallas Theatre at drama camp.
Studying her lines for an upcoming skit, Lauren Cote, 10, daughter of Margaret and Kenneth Cote, of Lithia Springs learns about acting at the Dallas Theatre at drama camp.
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Preparing to read his lines, Ethan Valbuena, 11, son of Martin and Jennifer Valbuena, of Hiram stands near the curtain of the Dallas Theatre stage during drama camp.
Preparing to read his lines, Ethan Valbuena, 11, son of Martin and Jennifer Valbuena, of Hiram stands near the curtain of the Dallas Theatre stage during drama camp.
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Acting like she is sipping tea, Hailey Nolan, 10, daughter of Jennifer and Dan Nolan of Acworth, practices her improv skills during drama camp.
Acting like she is sipping tea, Hailey Nolan, 10, daughter of Jennifer and Dan Nolan of Acworth, practices her improv skills during drama camp.
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 Lily Knupp, 11, daughter of Lane and Keith Knupp of Dallas, acts like she is playing the violin for drama camp.
Lily Knupp, 11, daughter of Lane and Keith Knupp of Dallas, acts like she is playing the violin for drama camp.
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For six weeks in the summer the Dallas Theater gives children a chance to learn about acting and perform in a play before family and friends.

The Summer Drama Camp is divided into age groups ranging from 5 to 15 years old. A different age group participates each week, and each camp runs Monday through Friday, said camp teacher Katie Behrens.

“There are different kids every week,” she said last week during the fourth week of sessions. “The whole goal of the camp is we produce a show in a week.”

The cost for the camp was $110 for ages 5 to 6, and $150 for the other students, said Shelley Hubbard, assistant manager at the theater.

The cost includes tuition, a T-shirt, and a pizza and cupcake party at the end of each session.

Camp enrollment was limited to 15 in the 5- to 6-year-old group and 20 for the others. Each session was filled to its maximum, though one spot remained in the 13 to 15 age group as of June 27.

This is Behrens’ fourth year teaching the camp, and she said most of the children return each year. Only five students in the session in the fourth week had not been to the camp before.

During the week the children learn different aspects of drama including acting, improvisation, makeup, costume, sets and auditions.

Though many have acted before they do not need experience to be part of the camp.

“It is something to get their feet wet,” Behrens said. “They all come in at varying levels.”

The 5- to 6-year-olds were in camp Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to noon, and the older children are there the same days from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

On Friday each group performs a free play for friends and family at 6 p.m. Each child has to know their lines by Thursday to be ready to perform at the end.

“Most of them already know their lines on Wednesday [in the fourth week session],” she said.

Each age group performs a different play, Hubbard said. The 5 to 6 group presented “The Nasty Flu Bugs Go Down,” and the 7 to 9 play was “Snew White.” The 10- to 12-year-olds performed “Gretchen and the Grudge” and the 13- to 15-year-old class will be announced the first day of camp, which is later this month.

The theater keeps the plays a secret until camp starts, she said. All plays have a character for each camper, and last between 15 and 20 minutes.

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