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Metro unemployment drops
by Savannah Weeks
December 27, 2012 02:06 PM | 1720 views | 0 0 comments | 14 14 recommendations | email to a friend | print
November unemployment rates in Fulton and Cobb counties are down 0.1 percent and 0.2 percent from October, respectively, according to data released from the Georgia Department of Labor Thursday.

Fulton’s jobless rate for November was 8.9 percent, down from 9.0 percent in October and 9.7 percent in November 2011.

Cobb’s unemployment rate for November was 7.3 percent, down from 7.5 percent and 8.1 percent in November 2011.

The Georgia unemployment rate was 8.7 percent in October and dropped to 8.5 percent in November.

Last year’s state unemployment rate for November was 9.5 percent.

The metro unemployment rate declined from 8.2 percent in October to 8.0 percent in November.

The area’s unemployment rate in November 2011 was 8.9 percent.

Sam Hall, a spokesman for the department, said the metro rate dropped because of two primary reasons: fairly good job growth and a reduction in new layoffs.

“Metro Atlanta is the economic engine that pulls the Georgia job train,” he said.

Hall said the job growth came in three areas: trade, transportation and warehousing; financial services; and education and healthcare.

According to Hall, job growth is up 1.5 percent from where it was a year ago.

The decrease in layoffs came in the fields of transportation and warehousing, construction, retail trade and administrative and support services.

“We’re glad to see employers laying off fewer people in those job sectors,” said Hall.

He indicated some of the growth and reduction in layoffs could be due to the holiday season.

The spokesman also said Georgia job increases for 2012 will likely be greater than expected.

“Throughout the past year, we heard economists say job growth would be in the 20,000 range,” Hall said last week. “At the end of the year, we feel pretty confident we’ll see job growth in the 40,000 to 45,000 range, which is better than what some economists were predicting.”

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