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Bartow youngsters give thoughts on Independence Day
by Monica Burge
July 01, 2013 04:57 PM | 1651 views | 0 0 comments | 64 64 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Miracle Houston, 6.
Miracle Houston, 6.
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Jacsen Bagley, 6.
Jacsen Bagley, 6.
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KJ Rogers, 8.
KJ Rogers, 8.
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Kalea Scoggins, 8.
Kalea Scoggins, 8.
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Kaitlyn Powell, 7.
Kaitlyn Powell, 7.
slideshow
National holidays are a standing tradition in American culture.

They are often times to reflect, enjoy family and celebrate milestones, births and momentous occasions.

This week we celebrate our nation’s birth and to get a little perspective on just what the Fourth of July means, the Neighbor talked to a few local children at the Cartersville Boys and Girls Club.

Out of the mouths of babes, the true essence of Independence Day becomes crystal clear.

K.J. Rogers, 8, of Cartersville said the Fourth of July is about patriotism.

“We are celebrating America,” K.J. said.

Of course, it’s also about socializing, not socialism.

“I like the Fourth of July because I like having different people in my neighborhood to play with,” K.J. said.

Jacsen Bagley, 6, of Cartersville said the Fourth of July is about one of our country’s most sacred symbols.

“The Fourth of July is about the American Flag,” Jacsen said. “There are 50 flags for 50 states and we celebrate each and every one.”

Miracle Houston, 6, of Cartersville, said it’s about spending time with family.

“It’s all about fun,” Miracle said.

Kaitlyn Powell, 7, said her favorite part of celebrating Independence Day takes place when the sun goes down.

“I like the fireworks,” Kaitlyn said.

From trips to the beach to backyard cookouts, families across Bartow County will take time out on this holiday to wish America a very “Happy Birthday.”

There was, however, hesitation and speculation among this group of youngsters about how many candles would be on the red, white and blue’s birthday cake.

Kalea Scoggins, 7, thought long and hard about just how old the U.S. actually is.

“It has to be really old,” Kalea said. “Maybe America is 50, because that’s a really old age.”
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