No variable specified
Roswell High School holds assembly encouraging teens not to text while driving
by Rachel Kellogg
September 25, 2013 12:42 PM | 1781 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Roswell High School Principal Jerome Huff spoke to students at the "It Can Wait Text and Drive" assembly sponsored by AT&T last Thursday afternoon. The event included remarks and participation by local legislative, law enforcement and educational leaders.
Roswell High School Principal Jerome Huff spoke to students at the "It Can Wait Text and Drive" assembly sponsored by AT&T last Thursday afternoon. The event included remarks and participation by local legislative, law enforcement and educational leaders.
slideshow
Roswell High School hosted an event Thursday asking students to sign a pledge promising to wait until they are no longer behind the wheel to reply and look at text messages.

Sponsored by AT&T, the “It Can Wait” campaign seeks to raise awareness of the dangers associated with distracted driving and prevent texting while driving.

Speakers at the event included Roswell Mayor Jere Wood, State Sen. John Albers, R-Roswell, Fulton County Schools Superintendent Robert Avossa, Principal Jerome Huff, Roswell Police Officer Erin Johnson and Brian Ortiz-Moreno, an AT&T representative who lost his son in a texting while driving accident.

“Raising awareness and educating our youth about the dangers of texting while driving will help make Georgia roads a safer place to drive,” said Albers.

As vice chair of the Senate Public Safety Committee, Albers challenged students to be responsible and engage in safe driving behaviors that won’t put themselves and others at risk.

Students were also able to participate in a “texting while driving” simulation, further emphasizing the inherent dangers and life-altering consequences of texting while operating a motor vehicle.

Albers asked students to be leaders and do the right thing by not texting and driving.

“It’s not a matter of if but when you will get into an accident,” he said.

Johnson said a texting driver is 23 times more likely to get into an accident than a non-texting driver.

During the assembly, Ortiz-Moreno spoke about his son’s death, saying the young man was replying to a text when he veered into another lane and hit an on-coming car.

“Technology’s great but it comes with a price,” he said, stressing the importance of using mobile electronics responsibly.

He continued, adding, when you text while driving, “you’re letting a 5,000- to 7,000-pound car decide for itself where it wants to go … when will you realize it’s not worth it?”

Information: www.itcanwait.com.

Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
*We welcome your comments on the stories and issues of the day and seek to provide a forum for the community to voice opinions. All comments are subject to moderator approval before being made visible on the website but are not edited. The use of profanity, obscene and vulgar language, hate speech, and racial slurs is strictly prohibited. Advertisements, promotions, spam, and links to outside websites will also be rejected. Please read our terms of service for full guides