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Douglasville Farmers and Artisans Market looks to brighter 2014
by Bill Baldowski
November 06, 2013 04:33 PM | 1290 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Debbie Fraker of Corn Creek Farm sets out her table of hand-made pottery as she prepares to welcome customers to the Douglasville Farmers and Artisans Market.
Debbie Fraker of Corn Creek Farm sets out her table of hand-made pottery as she prepares to welcome customers to the Douglasville Farmers and Artisans Market.
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Douglasville Farmers and Artisans Market vendors, from left, Lorri Mason of Stems N' Roots and Jaime brannon of Jmegirlshop, give an extra incentive to motorists on Broad Street to visit the market.
Douglasville Farmers and Artisans Market vendors, from left, Lorri Mason of Stems N' Roots and Jaime brannon of Jmegirlshop, give an extra incentive to motorists on Broad Street to visit the market.
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It is a “taste” of Douglasville in the truest sense of the word.

Every Wednesday from 3 to 6 p.m., the sidewalk in front of the Old Douglas County Courthouse Museum on Broad Street in Douglasville becomes a local market haven featuring the crops of local farmers and the products of local artisans which are sold to the general public.

Douglasville farmer Greg Hutchens, who organized this effort last year and coined its new name, the Douglasville Farmers and Artisans Market, said although the market has steadily become a more visible and familiar part of downtown Douglasville this year, he still has people who stop by for the first time and tell him they knew nothing of this effort to showcase locally grown foodstuffs or handmade items.

“Many of those who come by for the first time tell me if they had known this market was here, they would have visited from the outset.

“We are attracting customers because of our local flair, or perhaps I should use an even better descriptive phrase, because we are the true ‘taste’ of Douglasville,” he said with a smile.

Each week, from 12 to 15 vendors spread their foodstuffs or merchandise on tables along the sidewalk and go to great lengths to attract new customers.

Last week, for instance, in celebration of Halloween, the market had two vendors, dressed in Halloween attire, standing on the edge of heavily-traveled Broad Street with signs pointing to the market on the nearby sidewalk.

Hutchens said in regard to his produce as well as other farmers taking part in the market, “everything is organically grown as we use no pesticides or commercial fertilizers, because we feel that is what our customers want.”

“The same holds true for our artisans as everything they bring here, they have made themselves by hand,” he said.

The market will close this year on Nov. 13 and Hutchens would like to see a huge increase in traffic this week and next which, he believes, would make the Douglasville Farmers and Artisans Market better known.

“If we can get more people out to see us, see what we are all about and what we have to offer, I believe when we open again in April, through publicity and word-of-mouth, we will see even larger crowds taking advantage of what we have to offer,” he said
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