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Emory had ‘infectious’ desire to get things done
by Bill Baldowski
April 23, 2014 09:04 AM | 1184 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Staff / Samantha M. Shal

Fred Harris is shown in his restaurant with a hat worn by the late ‘Captain’ Herb Emory at the most recent Toys for Tots event. The pair wore different hats during the event each year.
Staff / Samantha M. Shal Fred Harris is shown in his restaurant with a hat worn by the late ‘Captain’ Herb Emory at the most recent Toys for Tots event. The pair wore different hats during the event each year.
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Staff / Samantha M. Shal

Fred Harris displays a photo of the late Herb Emory during a Toys for Tots event at his restaurant.
Staff / Samantha M. Shal Fred Harris displays a photo of the late Herb Emory during a Toys for Tots event at his restaurant.
slideshow
Staff / Samantha M. Shal

Fred Harris talks about the giving nature of the late Herb Emory, who never asked for anything in return, while looking through photos at his restaurant.
Staff / Samantha M. Shal Fred Harris talks about the giving nature of the late Herb Emory, who never asked for anything in return, while looking through photos at his restaurant.
slideshow
Herb Emory’s infectious smile, quick, natural wit and willingness to do anything at a moment’s notice for children’s charities, emergency responders and abandoned animals were not the only endearing attributes of the late Douglas County resident.

The 61-year-old TV and radio traffic reporter known as “Capt. Herb” died of a heart attack April 12 as he assisted emergency personnel attending to motorists injured in a wreck near his home.

Doris Isaacs, a member of the governing board of the Douglas County Boys & Girls Club, said Emory attended their functions for more than 15 years.

“Herb never met a stranger,” she said. “He would not only make you feel at ease and comfortable talking with him but he would make you feel like you were one of the most important people he had ever met.”

Emory, who worked at the Douglas Neighbor in the early 1980s, served as master of ceremonies at many club fundraisers, including its annual spaghetti dinner, Isaacs said.

Fred Harris, owner of Fred’s Bar-B-Q House in Lithia Springs, worked with Emory in the annual Christmas Toys for Tots campaign from 1997 through last year.

Emory had what Harris called, “can’t-say-no-itis.” He said Emory was available even if not directly asked to help any charity.

“Herb was very popular as a traffic reporter, but he used his popularity, influence and contacts to always help others,” he said.

Harris said he has not known many as dependable as Emory in making themselves available when the need was great, especially if it had to do with contributing to the charity or assisting others to do so.

Harris said he often witnessed Emory making calls to his contacts “and he was always able to get in touch with the right people at the right time to benefit Toys for Tots.”

“If Herb Emory’s name was attached to something, it would always get done, most times better than we could have hoped,” Harris said.

“Many have said Herb had an infectious wit but he also had an infectious desire to get things accomplished and that desire spread to others,” he said.

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