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Marist hosts ribbon cutting for new building
by Christine Fonville
May 27, 2014 09:49 AM | 3086 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Special Photo / From left, student council co-presidents Christopher Bowman and Katie Hearn cut the ribbon to Ivy Street Center, while school President the Rev. John Harhager, S.M., looks on.
Special Photo / From left, student council co-presidents Christopher Bowman and Katie Hearn cut the ribbon to Ivy Street Center, while school President the Rev. John Harhager, S.M., looks on.
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Last week the Marist School in Brookhaven held a ribbon-cutting ceremony for a new, three-story, 55,000-square-foot addition.

The new building, called the Ivy Street Center — a nod to the school’s first location on Ivy Street in downtown Atlanta — features classrooms, faculty offices, collaborative meeting spaces and expanded athletic facilities.

Classrooms are technology-focused and equipped with interactive, digital components throughout the building.

It is the signature project of the school’s campus master plan, which seeks to enhance the school through expansions, renovations, construction and development on the campus.

Michael Cote, chair of the master plan committee, said projects like the new center will help the school’s students succeed in a “constantly changing world.”

“The campus master plan, through projects like Ivy Street Center, is ensuring that the school continues to innovate, giving faculty and students the best tools to succeed,” he said. “[The center] is a prime example of what we hope to accomplish with the campus master plan, and we look forward to many generations of future Marist graduates benefitting from it.”

The construction of the new building was financed by a $35 million capital campaign that relied on support from donors as well as two challenge gifts totaling $3.25 million.

The total construction cost for the center was $14.6 million. In order to build the new center, the Kuhrt Gymnasium, a “focal point of student life for nearly five decades,” according to a news release, had to be torn down.

In June 2013, the gymnasium was demolished, paving the way for the center to be constructed on its footprint. However, the gymnasium inside retains the Kuhrt name.

School President John Harhager said only through community support could a project of this magnitude be completed.

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